Historians Young and Old (some with rabbits)

Marcia Mayo

History Just for Kids is a place to share ideas for helping children understand that history is about real people in real places and it not only happened in the past, it's also happening right now. If you have a site you love or an idea you'd like to share, let me know and I'll include it.

You can contact me at marciamayo@yahoo.com or at 678-628-4193.

Connections to Secret Stories ~ click and scroll down

Secret Stories from Peachtree Creek Connections 
Unit Activities and Exploration Links


To teachers using this instructional tool:
After working for what seemed to be days, I was finally able to get rid of the wacky formatting under the Frances section in Firefox, but it's still showing up if you are using Internet Explorer.  My apologies.  If you want those particular links that are hiding under the boxes, email me at marciamayo@yahoo.com and I'll send them to you.

In addition, if any of you have Smartboards, my sister-in-law created a Smartboard notebook that goes along with Secret Stories.  The file is quite large but I'll figure out a way to get it to you via flashdrive if you want it.  Just let me know, again at marciamayo@yahoo.com.

To purchase a copy of Secret Stories from Peachtree Creek, order here. You can now also purchase Secret Stories in Kindle edition for just $2.99 (and no shipping). To make that happen, order here.  For more information, send an email to marciamayo@yahoo.com. 


Tuck 
1786 

 Although Tuck didn’t think of himself at a “Creek Indian”, his village of Standing Peachtree was what we now consider to have been a Creek village. 

For information about and a field trip to where the Village of Standing Peachtree stood, see 

Standing Peachtree 











For information about Fort Peachtree, see

Fort Peachtree 

For information about the Creek people and places to visit, see 

Indian Springs State Park 

Etowah Indian Mounds

Ocmulgee National Monument

 Legacy Museum on Main

 Creek Indian Records

 Lost Worlds

Creek Indians 

Facts for Kids



 Although Tuck, if he had been a real person, probably wouldn’t have been aware of it, in 1786 Georgia was already a colony, established as the last of the Thirteen Colonies in 1732, and just the year before, in 1785, the University of Georgia was founded. 






To learn more about what was happening in the world in 1786, see

Historical Events in 1786 

The following are good places to find information about most anything having to do with Georgia History: 

Atlanta History Center

 Georgia Historical Society 



Susannah 
1838 

 (Wilbur Kurtz's watercolor rendition of Henry Irby's Tavern, 
courtesy of the Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center.) 
Taken from Buckhead Heritage Society website 

No matter where you live, there are houses and buildings that have been around for a long time.  Try to find out their history. 

Although, in Susannah’s story, her father owned the store and tavern with the deer’s head mounted out front, according to history, it was Henry Irby who killed a large deer and mounted its head on a post near his place of business so travelers could see it. 

What is currently in the middle of Atlanta was first called Irbyville and then later Buckhead. The area is now commemorated in Buckhead Triangle Park at the intersection of Peachtree, Paces Ferry Road and Roswell Road. 


The Storyteller by Frank Fleming Note the deer head on the storyteller Photograph: waymarking.com 








For more information about the history of Buckhead, see




Susannah’s father’s hero was Patrick Henry and Susannah named her adopted dog Pat so her father would let her keep him. 
For information about Patrick Henry, see

Colonial Williamsburg 

Social Studies for Kids 

Susannah’s secret best friend, Senoya, was Cherokee. There’s lots of information about the Cherokee people. See below: 

Funk Heritage Museum 

About North Georgia 

Cherokee Facts for Kids 

There were some very wealthy Cherokee people. Here’s a site that shows a photograph of a mansion owned by a Cherokee chief. 

Chief Vann House 

Susannah taught Senoya to write in English and Senoya taught Susannah to write in Cherokee. To learn about Sequoyah and the Cherokee alphabet, see

Sequoyah and the Cherokee Alphabet 

Houghton Mifflin Primary Sources 

Senoya and her family were forced to leave their home as part of the Indian Removal Act, now known as the Trail of Tears. For links to information about the Trail of Tears, see 

The Trail of Tears 

Social Studies for Kids 

In 1838, Queen Victoria was crowned Queen of England and the first telegraph message was sent. To learn more about what was happening in the world in 1838, see 

Historical Events for 1838



James 
1864 
Battle of Peachtree Creek By Rick Reeves 

James grew up on a medium-sized cotton plantation in South Georgia. Although Jarrell Plantation was in Middle Georgia, it was a cotton plantation around the time of the Civil War and it is now a Georgia Department of Natural Resources Historic Site and you can visit it in Juliette, GA. 

For more information, see 

Jarrell Plantation  

In addition, you can visit a slave cabin that’s part of the Tullie Smith Farm at the Atlanta History Center

For more information on plantations in Georgia, see 

Genealogy Trails 

James’ songs had to do with the Underground Railroad. To find out more, see

National Geographic Education 

PBS 

The Freedom Center 

Scholastic 

National Park Service 

The battle in which James and his father fought later became known at the Battle of Peachtree Creek. For more information, see 

Roadside Georgia 

History Net 

On this Day in History 

The night before the Battle of Peachtree Creek James and his father tasted hard tack for the first time. Below is a recipe for hard tack (without the maggots). 

The history of hard tack 

 Recipe for hard tack 

Most of the news in the year 1864 had to do with the Civil War. For information about what else was happening, see 

History Orb 

James played a flute his father had made for him. You can make your own flute. Here are some instructions: 

Activity TV 




Rosie 
1910 


Rosie wasn’t real and the house she was visiting wasn’t real either, but, if it were, it might look something like the Andrews-Dunn house in the picture below. For more information about the Andrews-Dunn house and the people who lived there, click on the link under the picture. 







 Rosie was a mill worker from an early age. Today, there are laws that keep young children in the United States from working. However, in some countries, young children work at jobs that keep them from attending school, and some of the jobs can be dangerous. For more information about child labor, see

Child Labor Public Education Project 

The History Place 

Although the mill itself closed in 1971, the Whittier Mill area of Atlanta still exists as a neighborhood. It’s on the National Register of History Districts and you can visit the park there. Most of the mill's remains were demolished in 1988, leaving the skeletal ruins of the carpenters’ shed and the original mill tower, which had once housed offices, the mill’s chemist, and a water tank for fire protection during the mill’s heyday. For more about the history of Whittier Mill see:

Whittier Mill Village 

Rosie rode the trolley from Whittier Mill to Atlanta and then back again at the end of the summer. Trolleys were also called streetcars. For more information about trolleys, see


Streetcars in Atlanta 

The Trolley Barn 

The Trolley Stop 

Rosie’s aunt was a seamstress. In the early 1900’s, most clothing for women (and for many men) was hand sewn either by a seamstress or a tailor or by someone in the family. For more information about the history of clothing, see 

Short History of Ready-Made Clothing

History of Later North American Clothing 

Brief History of Clothing 

What was happening in the world in 1910? For information, see 

Historical Events in 1910


Carl
1964


Carl was a black kid growing up in Atlanta in the middle of the Civil Rights movement. It was an exciting time, but it was also scary; both good and bad things were happening very quickly. Within just a year, Martin Luther King Jr. made his “I Have a Dream” Speech in Washington and the Civil Rights Act was passed. But a terrible thing happened when President Kennedy was assassinated. For more information about the Civil Rights movement, see: 

Heroes of the Civil Rights movement 

Kids’ Konnection 

PBS Teachers 

Civil Rights in Atlanta 


For information about Martin Luther King, Jr., see 

National Geographic Kids 

Social Studies for Kids 

Pitara Kids Network 



For information about John F. Kennedy, see 

Miller Center

The Kennedy Library 







When Carl wasn’t worrying about his future, he liked to read and create comic books. Even comic books have a history. To find out more, see 

About.com 

Comicbooks.com 

If you want to make your own comic book, you can just do like Carl and Tommy did: staple some pages together and get going. For more ideas, see 

Enchanted Learning 

How to Make Mini Comic Books 

Create your Own Comic Strip 

Carl also liked to watch TV. Although color TV came out in 1954, most people had black and white televisions until the late 1960’s. For more about the history of television, see: 

FCC 

What was happening in the world in 1964? For information, see 

Historical Events in 1964 




Frances 
2010 



Frances is a kid very much like you, a kid living in what is now called Atlanta. She goes to school and plays with her friends and hangs out in her backyard, which just happens to back up to Peachtree Creek. 



For more information about Peachtree Creek, see



There are some great things to do in Atlanta.  For some ideas, see







There are also so many interesting and fun things to do all over Georgia.  For some ideas, see




Pollution has become a big problem all over the world and Peachtree Creek is no exception.  To find out more about water pollution and how to help, see



Homelessness is also a problem in Atlanta and many other big cities. For information, see 

The following are good places to find information about most anything having to do with Georgia History: 

Georgia Historical Society 


Graphic Organizer for Understanding the History Behind

Secret Stories from Peachtree Creek


Characters
World Events
Description of Home
Education
Family
Problems
The Tree and the Creek
Tuck 1786










Susannah 1838










James 1864










Rosie 1910










Carl 1964










Frances 2010










 


  Multiple Choice Questions Secret Stories from Peachtree Creek 
These can be used to create an AR Quiz or just for a quick assessment 

1. Frances and her mother disagreed about
 A. what to eat for supper. 
B. how to make her bed. 
C. who her friends should be. 
D. where to go on vacation. 

2. Tuck was worried about 
A. his dog, Efv. 
B. bullies. 
C. where to catch a fish. 
D. a flood. 

3. Susannah was sad because 
A. her father wouldn’t let her keep Black Dog Pat. 
B. her parents wanted to move to Virginia 
C. Senoya would be leaving. 
D. the journal got wet. 

4. Hard tack is 
A. The name of a song the slaves sang. 
B. a kind of biscuit James and his daddy ate the night before the battle. 
C. James’ favorite candy. 
D. the same thing as hard work. 

5. How did Rosie get from Whittier Mill to “the rich part of Atlanta”? 
A. On a trolley. 
B. She swam. 
C. By airplane. 
D. On a horse. 

6. What was Carl afraid of? 
A. spiders 
B. dogs 
C. having to change schools 
D. comic books 

7. What did NOT change in the book? 
A. the homes 
B. the tree 
C. the place 
D. the creek 

8. What did the dogs do that was an important part of the plot? 
A. They ate the food. 
B. They played in the creek. 
C. They saved the kids. 
D. They dug the holes. 

9. How were the kids in the book the same? 
 A. They all went to school. 
B. They all had families. 
C. They all ate fish. 
D. They all were Native American. 

10. How did Peachtree Creek change during the book? 
A. It became longer. 
B. It became bluer. 
C. It became polluted. 
D. It didn’t change. 


Multiple Choice Questions Secret Stories from Peachtree Creek Teacher Key 


1. Frances and her mother disagreed about
 A. what to eat for supper. 
B. how to make her bed. 
C. who her friends should be. 
D. where to go on vacation. 

2. Tuck was worried about 
A. his dog, Efv. 
B. bullies. 
C. where to catch a fish. 
D. a flood. 

3. Susannah was sad because 
A. her father wouldn’t let her keep Black Dog Pat. 
B. her parents wanted to move to Virginia.
C. Senoya would be leaving.
D. the journal got wet. 

4. Hard tack is 
A. The name of a song the slaves sang. 
B. a kind of biscuit James and his daddy ate the night before the battle. 
C. James’ favorite candy. 
D. the same thing as hard work. 

5. How did Rosie get from Whittier Mill to “the rich part of Atlanta”? 
A. On a trolley
B. She swam. 
C. By airplane. 
D. On a horse. 

6. What was Carl afraid of? 
A. spiders 
B. dogs 
C. having to change schools 
D. comic books 

7. What did NOT change in the book? 
A. the homes 
B. the tree 
C. the place 
D. the creek 

8. What did the dogs do that was an important part of the plot? 
A. They ate the food. 
B. They played in the creek. 
C. They saved the kids. 
D. They dug the holes. 

9. How were the kids in the book the same? 
 A. They all went to school. 
B. They all had families. 
C. They all ate fish. 
D. They all were Native American. 

10. How did Peachtree Creek change during the book? 
A. It became longer. 
B. It became bluer. 
C. It became polluted. 
D. It didn’t change.



Secret Stories from Peachtree Creek 
Vocabulary Words by Chapter 

Chapter 1: Frances 
1. stump - the lower end of a tree or plant left after the main part falls or is cut off 
2. damage - injury or harm 
3. salary - pay 
4. cranky – grouchy or cross 
5. compost - a mixture of various decaying organic substances, as dead leaves or manure, used for fertilizing soil 
6. critter - creature 
7. abandoned - deserted 
8. crusty – having a crust 
9. hinge - a jointed device or flexible piece on which a door, gate, shutter, lid, or other attached part turns, swings, or moves 
10. depressed – sad and gloomy 


Chapter 2: Tuck 

1. enemy – a person who feels hatred for another person 
2. weapon – anything used against an opponent 
3. tobacco - any of several plants whose leaves are prepared for smoking or chewing or as snuff. 
4. grind - to reduce to fine particles, as by pounding or crushing 
5. elder – a person who is older or who has a high rank 
6. tamp - to force in or down by repeated strokes 
7. turban - a man's headdress consisting of a long cloth wound around the head 
8. sacrifice - to surrender or give up for the sake of something else 
9. brace - something that holds parts together or in place 
10. cunning - cleverness 
11. sinew - tendon 
12. hearth – the floor or a fireplace or fire pit 
13. taunt - tease 
14. yelp - to give a quick, sharp, shrill cry, as a dog or fox 
15. navigate - to walk or find one's way 
16. ancestry - family or ancestral descent 
17. confound - confuse 
18. ruffian - bully 
19. skitter - to go or run rapidly 
20. sapling – a young tree 

Chapter 3: Susannah 

1. settlement - a place newly settled 
2. embroidery - making designs with a needle and thread on fabric 
3. tavern – restaurant and bar 
4. likker – slang for beer or whiskey 
5. skillet – frying pan 
6. half penny – a coin worth half a penny 
7. escape – to get away 
8. counter - a table or display case on which goods can be shown 
9. chores – everyday work about the house or farm 
10. version - a particular type of something 
11. fetch - to go and bring back 
12. scrap – a small piece 
13. memorize – to commit to memory 
14. stern – strict or harsh 
15. mangy – skin disease that causes loss of fur 
16. original – the first 
17. symbol – a mark that means something 
18. shoo – to scare or force away 
19. merit - worth 
20. progress – movement toward a goal 

Chapter 4: James 

1. musty – smelling old 
2. talented – having a special ability 
3. Union – the army fighting for the North in the Civil War 
4. Confederate – the army fighting for the South in the Civil War 
5. plantation – a large farm 
6. master – someone who owns a slave 
7. slave – a person who is the property of another person 
8. emancipation -freedom 
9. flute – a musical instrument made of a tube with finger holes 
10. possession – to own something 
11. inherited – to get something from someone else 
12. route – a specific way to travel 
13. freedom – being able to do what you want 
14. current – the flow of a river or creek 
15. general – a high ranking officer in the Army 
16. mongrel – a dog of mixed breed 
17. harm - hurt 
18. battle - fight 
19. snout – nose of an animal 
20. litter - trash 

Chapter 5: Rosie 

1. grateful - appreciative 
2. trousseau – clothes for a bride for her wedding and marriage 
3. seamstress – a woman whose job is to sew 
4. mill – factory 
 5. bobbin – a spool that holds thread 
6. spinner - someone who spins thread in a factory
7. lint – bits of thread 
8. tributary – a stream that flows into a river 
9. contain – to hold 
10. penmanship - handwriting 
11. sums - addition 
12. bandstand – a platform for outdoor band concerts 
13. flap - something flat that is attached at one side and covers an opening 
14. homesick – sad because of missing home or family 
15. unearth - uncover 
16. lurch – stagger or trip 
17. stray – a homeless animal 18. crinoline – a stiff petticoat or slip 
19. collapse – to fall or cave in 
20. trolley – a car or train that moves on a track 

Chapter 6: Carl 

1. construction – the act of building 
2. modern – new or current 
3. estate – a large house and yard 
4. optimism – a belief that things will turn out well 
5. silverware – eating utensils like fork, spoon, and knife, usually made with silver 
6. civil rights – having the same rights as everyone else 
7. crew – a group of people who work together 
8. illustrate – to draw pictures to help explain 
9. spectacular – big and thrilling 
10. muzzle – the nose and mouth of a dog 
11. shiver – to shake with cold or fear 
12. spine - backbone 13. relatives – family members 
14. thereafter - afterward 
15. site - place 
16. chainsaw – an electric or gas powered saw 
17. courage - bravery 
18. afford – to have enough money to buy something 
19. annoying - irritating 
20. plot – storyline, what happens in a story 

Chapter 7: Frances 

 1. attempt – to try 
2. pry – to open by leverage 
3. crevice – a crack 
4. gnaw – to chew 
5. anxious - worried 
6. puzzled - confused 
7. irritated - annoyed 
8. burlap – a kind of inexpensive fabric used for sacks 
9. positive – sure, not questioning 
10. account – an oral or written description of events 




Click on the cover to order - also available in Kindle